Immigrating to Canada or Australia - Pros and Cons

July 10, 2008

Are you interested in immigrating to Canada or Australia? I plan to leave the UK and start a business in another country, in the near future and these two places are high on my list. We’ve been looking at the pros and cons of each. Here’s what I’ve discovered so far:

Australia


Image by Jezuez471


I’d never really considered immigrating to Australia until this year and after further research the idea seemed appealing. We narrowed our choices down to Perth or Melbourne and these are some of the Pros and Cons we found:

Pros

1. Plenty of natural open space and low population.
2. Great weather - particular in Perth with hot temperatures year round.
3. Good educational system.
4. Opportunity to spend most of our time outdoors - warm enough to make use of an outdoor pool.
5. Booming economy.
6. Fairly reasonable house prices - although prices have shot up recently, it is still possible to get a much better house for your money than in the UK.
7. Reasonable travel distance to many parts of Asia.
8. Laid back people - nobody expecting you to be available 24/7, which has become the norm for us in the UK.
9. No language barrier.
10. Amazing beaches.

Cons

1. Could be a little bit too isolated. Perth is around 4 hours flight from other major cities in Australia.
2. Flight prices are expensive from Australia to other parts of the world. We learned that many immigrants from the UK were only able to afford to visit relatives once every three years.
3. There is a lot of private education. On average it is cheaper than private education in the UK but there’s waiting lists for many of the better schools.
4. We would need to rent a house initially and the price of rental properties seems high - particularly in Perth.
5. Mortgage interest rates are high in comparison to the UK. What we would save on the price of property would probably be lost on the high interest rates.
6. Critters - I’m not keen on snakes, spiders and other critters - ok, I’m terrified of them. And there’s many poisonous species in Australia. Some people say they rarely see them, whilst others say they encounter them all the time.
7. People may be too laid back for me - I’m quite impatient and if I waited in all day for a delivery and it didn’t arrive, I wouldn’t be too happy.
8. Visa applications can take a while and it’s extremely expensive to apply for an Australian visa. It does seem faster to obtain a temporary business visa, but then you’re committing yourself to lots of rules and restrictions.
9. Travel to other parts of the world, aside from Asia is not so convenient. And we really want to see many parts of Europe, Canada, Alaska and the USA.
10. All year round hot temperatures may be a bit too much for us. We’re used to the cold and working in the heat is not the same as relaxing in it.
11. Might be a bit too flat for us. We like mountainous areas.
12. Costs of secondhand cars, electrical equipment and books seems high.
13. Some people say there is a lot of racism and sexism in Australia. I don’t know if this is just in certain areas, or the whole country in general.

Canada


Image by Quinet

Canada is a place I’ve always wanted to visit and it is high up on my list. So far we’re leaning towards British Columbia, for it’s beautiful scenery and mild winters.

Pros

1. Plenty of natural open space and low population.
2. Good place to start a business.
3. No language barrier.
4. Beautiful and scenic - we love lakes and mountains.
5. Cheaper and easier to visit friends and family. Even British Columbia is only 9 and a half hours away and low cost airlines such as Fly Globespan and Canadian Affair make the journey less costly.
6. Not too far to travel to many places we want to see.
7. Doesn’t take too long to get a temporary work permit - subject to a few terms and conditions.
8. Good educational system.
9. Plenty of opportunity to spend time outdoors - including skiing in the winter.

Cons

1. Canada doesn’t have the year round good weather that Perth in Australia has.
2. Critters - not as many snakes and spiders but you could wake up to find a bear in your back garden. I’ve heard that racoons can also be pesky.
3. Some visa applications can take years - although you can apply for them before you get a work permit. But this would mean we’d have to work for someone else for a while.
4. Although Canada is close to many places we want to travel to - it’s not hugely convenient for touring Europe.
5. House prices are particularly expensive in the Vancouver area and so are rental properties.
6. Would take longer to build up a credit rating and get a mortgage than it would in Australia.
7. Taxes seem higher than they do in Australia - I read somewhere that they add 15% to most purchases.
8. Most UK electrical goods would be useless in Canada, so it’s probably not worth taking your own.

Are you considering emigrating? Or have you taken the plunge already? How is it going? Are these pros and cons fairly accurate or have I slipped up in my research? Are there any other pros and cons to add that would help others make a decision?

Further reading

Immigrating - Choosing Where To Go

Is This The Ultimate Entrepreneurial Dream?

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Comments

27 Responses to “Immigrating to Canada or Australia - Pros and Cons”

  1. Kelly@SHE-POWER on July 10th, 2008 4:47 am

    Wow this is so detailed. Impressive.

    Have never been to Canada, though have friends who live and have lives there and us Aussies always get on well with Canadians. Tend to have more of them emigrate here than Americans.

    As for cons with Australia. We have mountains, lots of them, it just depends where you live. Perth may be pretty warm all year around, but lots of other parts of Australia are not. Where I live near Sydney is bloody cold right now - 10 degrees or so.

    You do not HAVE to send your kids to a private school to get a good education here. Australia is still very much a place where you make your own way and you can be whatever you want, no matter how much money you have. Yes, there is an increasing trend for private education but much of that is because our last government favoured private over public, but thank god they’re gone now.

    Distance and flights - yes, it may be an issue. No arguments there.

    This laid back thing everyone talks about, I’m really not sure about. Apparently Australia has some of the longest working hours in the world. When I was dealing with exports in my marketing days, I have to admit I didn’t find the English any more organised or timely than us. Now the Japanese, that’s a different issue…

    Also doubt we have more racism or sexism than where you’re from. Though I’m sorry if this offends anyone, but Qld is DEFINITELY more backward than NSW or VIC. Do not use it as a comparison for the rest of the country. And yes, I have lived in all three states.

    You talk about capital cities, but maybe you should also consider satellite cities near the capitals. Better priced housing. Access to everything city has to offer and less rush and better life for kids.

    Good luck with your decision making.

    Kelly

    Kelly@SHE-POWER’s last blog post..It’s official: Australians are Fat and Badly Dressed

  2. Barbara Swafford on July 10th, 2008 5:54 am

    Hi Catherine,

    How ironic. I just read Kelly’s comment and saw the link at the bottom: “It’s official: Australians are Fat and Badly Dressed”. Hehe!

    I’m sure your decision can’t be an easy one. If you talk/communicate with people like Kelly and others off line, it might make your decision making process easier. .

    There are a few visitors that come to my blog who are from Canada and Australia. I will email you, and maybe you can get more details from them too.

    Barbara Swafford’s last blog post..Your Today Is My Tomorrow

  3. Cath Lawson on July 10th, 2008 12:40 pm

    Hi Kelly - thank you. True - I have only really looked at major cities and the surrounding areas. I really like the look of Perth best but it is a long way from other places in Australia.

    I looked at the area where you live and it is very nice - plus the house prices are far more reasonable than Sydney. My only concern would be the commute time to Sydney if we had to work there.

    So, it sounds like Australia isn’t as laid back as I’d thought. The trouble is, when I’m researching, I’m reading stuff written by people from London and other big cities. I live in a tiny village, so I’m guessing their idea of laid back would not be the same as mine.

    I will definitely look at some of the satellite cities too.

    Hi Barbara - thanks, that would be useful. The decision making is tough, but interesting and the Internet really helps. Forums are interesting but you really have to hang round for a while and get the opinions of people who have similar tastes to you.

    I was really surprised by Kelly’s post - I imagined most Australian’s would be slim and tanned. It’s a really interesting read.

    Cath Lawson’s last blog post..Immigrating to Canada or Australia - Pros and Cons

  4. Friar on July 10th, 2008 1:32 pm

    Being Canadian, here’s my input (pros and cons)

    Living in Western Canada is the most expensive. (In Calgary, you’re looking at $400-500K for a house…probably even more in Vancouver).

    But Vancouver is extremely beautiful, and Calgary is only 1 hour from the Rocky Mountains (which in my opinion, is the most beautiful area in all of North America) .

    Vancouver is basically the same climate as a temperate rain forest. So it DOES get very wet.

    If you dont’ like crowds and smog and traffic, stay away from Southern Ontario (i.e. Toronto Metropolitan region).

    Vancouver and Southern Ontario have the mildest winters in the country. In other places, be prepared for minus 30C at times.

    World class wilderness canoe camping (tens of thousands of lakes in Ontario and Quebec). Great fishing too.

    If you move to Quebec, it would make life easier if you knew French. (By law, your kids would have to go to French school, unless you paid $$$ to send them to an English Private School).

    Health care system is free. But there are also huge waiting lists for MRI’s and CAT-Scans, and a big doctor shortages (and there is no private health care here, so it’s not like you can pay extra out of your own pocket to get better health care). Not unless you cross the border to the states.

    Martimes people are very friendly. But the weather is cool and damp.

    I visited Oz a few years back. I found them very similar to Canadians, but a bit more laid back. (We’re very polite and friendly, but a bit up-tight).

    The Canadian Rockies have some of the best skiing in the world (I’ve met people from the UK who prefer BC to the crowded Alps in Europe!)

    Lots of Canadians hate winter and mope indoors and head south. But a lot of Canadian adapt…to survive here, you have to embrace winter and take up things like hockey, skiing, skating, snowmobiing, etc.. (I happen to love winter!).

    The weather is never boring.

    Friar’s last blog post..More Things Old People Like

  5. James Chartrand - Men with Pens on July 10th, 2008 1:45 pm

    Hmm, I’m with Friar. There’s a huge difference comparing Vancouver, a large metropolitan city, to Dalkeith, Ontario (not large or metropolitan).

    Western Canada is very expensive. Mid to Eastern Canada is not.

    Language barriers do exist. Parlez-vous Français? Canada has two official languages.

    Cost of living varies widely between the coasts.

    The climate isn’t poor or not nice weather. Wintertime is actually extremely beautiful and not a harsh living condition.

    Critters - unless you’re out bushwhacking, the chances of a bear are slim to none. And raccoons? This is a fearful thing?

    Electronics - well, that’s true. We don’t have your plugs. Were you planning on moving toasters?

    It would have been better to compare CITIES versus whole countries, as the post gives an inaccurate portrayal of our country. Compare apples to apples, not bananas to grapes.

    James Chartrand - Men with Pens’s last blog post..Real Authors and the Paradox of Desktop Publishing

  6. Cath Lawson on July 10th, 2008 2:22 pm

    Thanks Friar - I’ve been checking out house prices and Vancouver is extremely expensive to buy, but Vancouver Island seems more reasonable - in comparison to the UK. I like the idea of the milder winters.

    Now that’s interesting - I didn’t realise you had no private health care. I would prefer not to have private health care, as I would hate to queue jump and deprive someone else. But I can understand how it would be necessary sometimes - especially if you were seriously ill.

    Hi James -
    Sorry if the pros and cons were a little misleading. I was mostly trying to compare Vancouver area to Perth and Melbourne - I know that both countries are huge and varied.My French isn’t brilliant, as I don’t use if often. And my son hates French classes at school - so your neck of the woods is probably out for us.

    Don’t think we would bring any furniture or electrical items at all. It is so expensive and you risk having it trashed in transit anyway.

    Am glad the bear problem isn’t as bad as I thought, which is good as I would hate to bump into one. I’m guessing the major problem with racoons is that they go through your garbage and make a mess. But the cats where I live do that anyway - we eat a lot of fish, which probably doesn’t help.

    I’m thinking maybe we should research other areas too because, as you mentioned - the costs in the Vancouver area are extremely high. Alberta looks very beautiful, as does Southern Ontario.

    Cath Lawson’s last blog post..Immigrating to Canada or Australia - Pros and Cons

  7. Hunter Nuttall on July 10th, 2008 2:22 pm

    Don’t forget that moving to Australia would likely help your blogging. I guess there’s something in the water…

    Hunter Nuttall’s last blog post..Overnight Success

  8. Cath Lawson on July 10th, 2008 3:18 pm

    Hi Hunter - Great point - it seems like that many of the top bloggers are Australian. Mmm - I wonder if I’ll get more traffic if Harry and James change my logo to a boomerang or a koala or something?

    Cath Lawson’s last blog post..Immigrating to Canada or Australia - Pros and Cons

  9. James Chartrand - Men with Pens on July 10th, 2008 3:30 pm

    Hey. We *love* the Koala Brothers… easy to make you an Auz Blogger!

    James Chartrand - Men with Pens’s last blog post..Real Authors and the Paradox of Desktop Publishing

  10. Davina on July 10th, 2008 6:29 pm

    What can I say, I’m partial to Vancouver after having left Toronto over 8 years ago. But, yes it is very expensive. The bears are not a problem - that’s just media hype. Neither is the weather. They say it rains here all the time, but I don’t notice it. Or perhaps I’ve just gotten used to it.

    West Vancouver is the more pricey / elite area to live. North Vancouver is quieter and more removed from the city; a lot of retired people live there. Kitsilano is a younger, trendy spot. I’m not too familiar with the Island, but they say the weather is even better there than in Vancouver.

    It all depends on what type of lifestyle you are looking for and what your preferences are. There will be pros and cons everywhere you go. Think about what is most important to you Cath… what your values are.

    My chief complaint here other than the price of real estate is that there are too many cars on the road… and I don’t even drive! From where I live I can walk to the beach, the grocey store, downtown, etc. Everything is close, so no need for a car — less expense!

    Good luck with your decision-making. I’ll connect with you through email should you want more info :-)
    Davina’s last blog post..Magic Happens

  11. Ian Denny on July 10th, 2008 6:50 pm

    I love the idea of Australia. And having employed an Australian, I think it’s really interesting that Aussies love to emmigrate to the UK or at elast have some work experience over here. The attraction baffles me!

    I can see the attraction of the land of Oz.

    But is it that “a change is as good as a rest” and the excitement of emmigrating and the newness of a new environment appeals?

    And when people go in opposite directions between the UK and Oz, it seems to work out.

    Why is it?

    We still kind of employ our former Oz employee and I must admit that she was difficult to replace. She’s still on our About Us page because she still works for us remotely.

    We’re even talking to her about expanding her workload again as she may be more available.

    May be worth an e-chat with her? She’s based in Sydney.

    Ian Denny’s last blog post..Service Targets - 17th June 2008

  12. Jamie Harrop on July 10th, 2008 7:19 pm

    Hey Cath,

    Excellent post. I actually just applied for and have been granted an Australian working holiday visa. It was granted to me earlier this week, so I’ll be setting off from the UK to Australia on 1st September to spend 12 months travelling, living and working in what I class as the greatest nation on Earth. :-)

    I can’t wait. Moving, even if only for 12 months, is so exciting and scary.

    I wish you the best of luck in making your choice.

    Jamie

    Jamie Harrop’s last blog post..Childhood Memories - Join me on an Adventure

  13. Nick P on July 11th, 2008 1:59 am

    1. Plenty of natural open space and low population. YES
    2. Great weather - particular in Perth with hot temperatures year round. No - not all year round, it is only about 13 degrees in Perth now (the only year round hot places are North Northern Territory (Darwin is really the only place there and with a pop of little more than 100 000 it’s not for everyone.QLD is the best place for weather and being near civilisiation.
    3. Good educational system. - N/A to me
    4. Opportunity to spend most of our time outdoors - warm enough to make use of an outdoor pool. - not in Perth, Adelaide, Melbourne - it gets COLD there in winter! maybe not snow and minus temps, but cold all the same.
    5. Booming economy. - its currently faltering much like the rest of the world - and things in Oz are generally more expensive than in the UK!!!! (housing being the exception - byut as you say borrowing rates here are sky high)
    6. Fairly reasonable house prices - although prices have shot up recently, it is still possible to get a much better house for your money than in the UK. True
    7. Reasonable travel distance to many parts of Asia. - only an hour less than the UK if you live in Melbourne!
    8. Laid back people - nobody expecting you to be available 24/7, which has become the norm for us in the UK. - Mainly true
    9. No language barrier. - True except in QLD
    10. Amazing beaches. - Superb beaches

    Cons

    1. Could be a little bit too isolated. Perth is around 4 hours flight from other major cities in Australia. Travel between any major cities is LONG - flying is usually the only option.
    2. Flight prices are expensive from Australia to other parts of the world. We learned that many immigrants from the UK were only able to afford to visit relatives once every three years - thats probably coz the average income is lower and prices of almost everything higher
    3. There is a lot of private education. On average it is cheaper than private education in the UK but there’s waiting lists for many of the better schools. - N/A to me
    4. We would need to rent a house initially and the price of rental properties seems high - particularly in Perth. - not true, you can rent at pretty good rates here.
    5. Mortgage interest rates are high in comparison to the UK. What we would save on the price of property would probably be lost on the high interest rates. - a very real concern
    6. Critters - I’m not keen on snakes, spiders and other critters - ok, I’m terrified of them. And there’s many poisonous species in Australia. Some people say they rarely see them, whilst others say they encounter them all the time. - 2 big spiders in 9 months - not too bad!
    7. People may be too laid back for me - I’m quite impatient and if I waited in all day for a delivery and it didn’t arrive, I wouldn’t be too happy. - you might just chill out and become one of them….
    8. Visa applications can take a while and it’s extremely expensive to apply for an Australian visa. It does seem faster to obtain a temporary business visa, but then you’re committing yourself to lots of rules and restrictions. - visa process if handled by a pro is approx 4 months
    9. Travel to other parts of the world, aside from Asia is not so convenient. And we really want to see many parts of Europe, Canada, Alaska and the USA. - this is very true, not are you isolated to your city, you are also isolated to your country.
    10. All year round hot temperatures may be a bit too much for us. We’re used to the cold and working in the heat is not the same as relaxing in it. - it gets cold here in most places
    11. Might be a bit too flat for us. We like mountainous areas. nonsense - there are mountains everywhere
    12. Costs of secondhand cars, electrical equipment and books seems high. - true
    13. Some people say there is a lot of racism and sexism in Australia. I don’t know if this is just in certain areas, or the whole country in general. - no more than in the UK

    Hope the above may be of some help in your big decision!

  14. Cath Lawson on July 11th, 2008 5:56 am

    Hi James - I haven’t seen the koala brothers before - will have to watch them.

    Hi Davina - thanks for the useful info on the areas. It is interesting that you don’t have a car. We were just talking last night about how little we’ve used the car lately and whether it would be worth getting rid of it all together and renting one when we need one, so it’s nice to know that is a possibility. They are such a waste if you don’t use them much and fuel prices are ridiculous.

    Hi Jamie - Congratulations - that is brilliant - not long til 1st September. Are you going on your own, or with other people?

    I know someone who did exactly what you’re going to be doing and they loved it. I can’t get that type of visa as I’m not under 30. Will you apply for another visa to stay there if you like it?

    Hi Ian - The number of Australian’s coming to work here surprised me too. I was speaking to a few of them who were working in London and the main reason was higher salaries.

    That is interesting that you have a remote worker in Sydney. It would be good to speak to her.

    Hi Nick - thanks for all the detail. Its really useful. 13 degrees is pretty reasonable for the winter but I could see how you wouldn’t want to swim outdoors in it.

    I had read that Australia was quite flat but it seems there is mountains. We like walking a lot so that would be a plus (so long as I didn’t accidentally stand on a snake).

    Sexism is really bad in the north of the UK - but I would want to live somewhere where there was less - not the same. I think racism is worse in the south of our country.

    Two spiders is not bad in 9 months. My biggest worry is that I need to sleep with the windows open year round (even when it’s below freezing). Do they have any kind of insect screens or nets you can put on your windows there?

    It sounds like Melbourne isn’t very close to many places outside of Australia then - that is disappointing. I checked some of the flying times for Perth and they weren’t bad. Mind you, I couldn’t say that they were particularly close either.

    Cath Lawson’s last blog post..Immigrating to Canada or Australia - Pros and Cons

  15. Nick P on July 11th, 2008 6:10 am

    Hi Cath
    My first purchase when I arrived here was a “spider control kit” from the local supermarket…..I dont think they had ever sold one before, the locals thought I was bonkers! But it’s worked. And yes 99% of houses have screened windows and doors so you can sleep easy at night!

    The walking near Brissie where I live is superb, and I have never seen a snake (that’s not to say they’re not here tho), they hear you coming and disappear pretty quickly by all accounts.
    Nick

  16. Cath Lawson on July 11th, 2008 7:13 am

    Thanks Nick - a spider control kit sounds like a great idea. And screened windows and doors is a definite plus.

    Cath Lawson’s last blog post..Immigrating to Canada or Australia - Pros and Cons

  17. Jamie Harrop on July 11th, 2008 7:14 am

    Hey Cath,

    I’m going on my own, but I’ll be staying in backpacker hostels so I’ll no doubt meet up with plenty of other people and travel for short periods with them.

    I’d love to eventually move to Australia. However, I don’t have family down there, nor do I have a university degree, so it’s quite difficult for me to aquire enough “points” to qualify for the visa. Maybe after working down there for a year (with potential for a second year) I’ll be able to secure enough points. :-)

    Jamie

    Jamie Harrop’s last blog post..Childhood Memories - Join me on an Adventure

  18. Cath Lawson on July 11th, 2008 7:17 am

    Sounds good Jamie. I might be wrong but I think I read that if you study while you’re there and get the right qualification for one of their in demand trades or jobs, you don’t need to have work experience. I guess once you have a permanent visa, it doesn’t matter what you do.

    Cath Lawson’s last blog post..Immigrating to Canada or Australia - Pros and Cons

  19. Robin on July 12th, 2008 5:56 am

    Hi Cath

    Interesting to see your post! I live in Melbourne, and at risk of offending some Perth-ites, I suspect you may be better off over here - diversity, culture, food, cafe’s, coffee, music, scenery, mountains, history, east-coast holidays, bush-walking, skiing, temperature range (40). I wouldn’t worry about the people being too laid back! Or about critters.

    If buying a house is important to you, that may be an issue (and rent is high at the moment - but it’s all relative). Anyway - if you would like any more detailed information, please feel fee to email me.

    Cheers - Robin

    Robin’s last blog post..Gratitude and Miracles

  20. Robin on July 12th, 2008 5:59 am

    temp range was less than 10 to over 40 (moral: never use angle brackets on websites!)

    Robin’s last blog post..Gratitude and Miracles

  21. Bob Hill on July 12th, 2008 6:20 am

    Wow, Cath. This is right down my alley. I’m from the US, not the UK, but my partner and i moved to Brisbane three years ago and I blog on these issues from the perspective of a newcomer. I may be blogging about your questions for quite a while, starting tomorrow. For now, though, brief thoughts about these two observations you make about Australia:
    1. Plenty of natural open space and low population.
    2. Great weather - particular in Perth with hot temperatures year round.

    1. The smaller population does have an effect, mostly a positive one, I think, on many aspects of living here. Don’t forget, though, that most people live in thin strips along the coastlines and/or the capital cities. So, for most of the places where one might choose to live, the population density is not low.
    2. “Great weather” is exactly what we are having now in this Brisbane winter. The low was 8 last night and the high today is about 22. Very nice, indeed. By Christmas, though, the high are likely to be in the upper 30s and the humidity is likely to be high here. Perth will be that warm or hotter, but with low humidity, probably, and I would find that pretty nice. But since Australia is about the size of the US or the whole of Europe, the climate differences on any particular day are just as extreme. It’s easy to forget, from a distance, what a huge and varied place Australia really is.

    There’s great weather (depending on one’s definition of “great”) somewhere in Australia almost always, and the opposite, too. Thanks for giving me so much to think about and blog about.
    – Bob

  22. cathlawson on July 12th, 2008 11:30 am

    Hi Robin - Thank you - Melbourne does sound pretty amazing wth lots going for it. And I’m guessing it’s probably handier for visiting other parts of Australia than Perth is. I’ll email you.

    Hi Bob - that’s excellent weather for winter. I didn’t think about population density in terms of people living close together and near the coast but that’s a good point to consider.

    I’m looking forward to your blog posts. I love reading about you two texans down under.

  23. lissie on July 14th, 2008 1:31 am

    I’m a Kiwi living in Perth, but Ive also lived in the UK and I lived in vancouver years ago toor. Just to add my 2c:
    absolute temperatures are misleading - its 14C in Perth today- it was about the same in Wellington, NZ - but there it would have been windy and rainy and bitterly cold: here it rained heavily for 30 minutes, was overcast the rest of the time and I went out without a jacket.

    Melbourne has fantastic nightlife, shopping and food. Perth is a new city - full of immigrants: NZ, UK, SA hard to meet an Ozzie in some indstries. The town is spread out, the shopping hours are historic and hysterical (1 late nite no shopping on Sundays except in certain areas) there is no buzz to the town. On the other hand Perth and Brisbane are booming while NSW and Vic aren’t - all to do with the China resource boom.
    Perth has a winter - which is nice: we also swam in the sea from Nov-Apr- that was nicer! Its a dry heat much easier to deal with than Brisbane’s humiditity

    We drove 30000km around Australia last year - we saw 2 snakes - one in suburban Brisbane, one on the road in outback NSW. We had 1 spider in the tent - once. Your fears are common but not justified. A snake being seen in Perth made the local news: it had got picked up with camping gear and inadvertantly brought “home” LOL Snakes aren’t aggressive: bears can me: I have worked in remote areas in both countries: I prefer stupid reptiles to aggressive mammals any day!

    The most relevant language in Vancouver when I was there in 89 was Chinese not French: I believe there has been even more Asian immigration since then - which is a big positive - but I never needed French in practice

    Australia does not have hills. This is definitive : I have climbed to the top of their highest LOL! They have low bumps which look amazing compared to 2 days of driving thru the plains but hills: no. That said the scenary of the Kimberley s and the coral coast is just amazng - but hills no! For hills see NZ, North America, Himalayas, Switzerland.

    If a professional working couple in Perth can’t afford to go back home once every 3 years they are spending way too much living IMHO. If you have stirling and are selling in the UK u should be able to get a reasonable house in Perth for less that $500k

    Its not worth shipping your electrical gear to either country: in fact its not worth shipping anything except personal items that u are emotionally attached to

    lissie’s last blog post..Q10: A Retro Text Editor

  24. Four Pillars on July 14th, 2008 2:15 am

    Interesting post.

    I live in Toronto, Canada and have travelled quite a bit in western Canada (BC and Alberta) - I also spent a month traveling in Oz a few years ago including 2 weeks in Perth.

    I don’t have any great insight for you other than that either choice would be pretty good - you can’t make a mistake on this one!

    Mike

    Four Pillars’s last blog post..Friday Linkstuff

  25. cathlawson on July 14th, 2008 9:56 am

    Hi Lissie - Thank you - it doesn’t sound like I would be seeing snakes in the back garden every day then. I’m guessing the supermarket would be a bit mobbed on that one late night though.

    Re: Shipping costs - I see what you mean. They’re extortionate plus you run the risk of getting wooden furniture broken.

    I’m still concerned over the travel costs though. We’d want to come back to the UK at least once a year, as none of my husband’s children want to come with us and my children would also want to see the rest of their family.

    Hi Mike - it sounds like they’re all really nice places then. I’m also going to research other areas of Canada, as we’ve only looked at BC so far. It really is a massive place.

  26. Robert Hill on July 16th, 2008 2:09 am

    As I said I was going to, Cath, I’ve done a blog on your list of pros and cons about immigrating to Australia (I’m leaving assessments of Canada to others) and some of the responses you received. I hope you find it helpful. — Bob

  27. Live The Dream In Vancouver, Canada on December 16th, 2008 10:33 am

    [...] Interview With Davina Haisell of Crimson Compass Immigrating To Canada Or Australia - Pros and Cons Immigrating - Choosing Where To Go Is This The Ultimate Entrepreneurial Dream? Image [...]

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